The Conduit: A Point and Shoot Adventure

I’ve been a long time fan of the Wii. Initially it was because I was a Nintendo fan foaming at the mouth. But as I grew older during the Wii generation, I started liking the Wii specifically for its different takes on and unique implementations of certain genres. The design decisions made for the platform typically aimed to fit the motion controls or attempted to reach a wider audience. First Person Shooters seemed like a perfect fit for the console with the ability to perform precise aiming with the infrared pointer. As much as a no-brainer it seemed to be, the implementation was not so simple.

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Dragon Ball FighterZ – Problem Exists Between Controller and Chair

Despite living in the city which EVO is held, spectacle competitive gaming is something I’ve never resonated much with. I’m not good at fighting games and probably don’t even understand the simplest concepts to start becoming competitive. I just play them in my home against AI or online opponents for 5-20 hours before calling it a day and moving onto something else. This is how I like playing them, so it’s not really a bad thing in my eyes.

Dragon Ball FighterZ, in a lot of ways, feels like it’s intended to serve both an inexperienced and advanced audience. From the beginning you can see it. Even if you’re completely unaware of how to play a fighting game, pressing a single button over and over will automatically create a lengthy combo. Yet, at the same time, I’ve seen more advance players find ways to chain them together into one massive flurry. DBFZ puts me in a weird spot though.

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Draconus: Cult of the Wyrm – Medieval Knights on Ice

(Image Source: TheGameRoom)

Draconus: Cult of the Wyrm is a Dreamcast game that may seem like it has no relevance beyond its year of release. It’s the spiritual sequel to the 1998 PC exclusive, Die by the Sword, which offers free-ranged sword movement 20 years before The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword. More importantly, the developer behind Draconus – Treyarch – is now one of the major teams on the massively successful Call of Duty series. Along with Die by the Sword, Draconus is one of the only original franchises the team ever produced.

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The Cutting Room Floor Page for Final Fantasy XI

(Special thanks to Remidog for the title screen image!)

The Cutting Room Floor page for Final Fantasy XI is live! If you’re unaware, TCRF is a website used to document unused content from video games. An FFXI page didn’t exist, so I decided to create one for the PC version of Final Fantasy XI. I’m debating making a more extensive blog post to sum up my findings.

Special thanks to Rich Whitehouse who created the Noesis 3D model viewer tool and added support for Final Fantasy XI. I likely wouldn’t have taken up this project without his work allowing me to view and export data from the game.

Also special thanks to OtherEhm, who helped with using HxD and provided general support for setting up the TCRF page as well as deciphering data from Final Fantasy XI.

One Controller Port Podcast: Episode 41 – Lots of Sword Art Online

This week I talk about Sword Art Online and some of the video games surrounding it, as well as the gap in English language Japanese news coverage of video games.

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Final Fantasy XI: The Lost Town of Sel Phiner

Exploring unused content that doesn’t make it into a final game might be my favorite time sink on the internet. Over the years, I’ve spent many late nights on websites like The Cutting Room Floor and Unseen 64 digging through the discoveries of others. Exploring old game content, either via old media releases or even data mining the game itself, reveals development stories of what could have been.

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The Dead Joy-Con Dream

(Image Source: Nintendo UK)

Around August last year, I bought a Switch. That’s far from a surprise. I’ve focused on Nintendo platforms my entire life and know there will be a at least a handful of titles I’ll want at some point. However, there was one particular draw that I was excited for – the Joy-Cons themselves.

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