Valkyria Revolution: Making the Best of a Bad Situation

Valkyria Revolution is not well-liked. I’ve seen few who think this attempt to re-invent the brand as an Action RPG amounted to anything. By the nature of its design, it’s a repetitive game that almost completely destroys any preconceived notions of Valkyria as a strategy franchise. It seems like it has no business holding the name. But deeper within Valkyria Revolution, one particular aspect of the series remains – managing morale. This overtakes the entirety of the story as well as the gameplay, building the whole experience on the back of this singular element. Though from the beginning, it’s not clear that this is the case.

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One Controller Port Podcast – Episode 29: XenoEverything

This week talk about my time with Valkyria Revolution, the forever changing art style of the Xeno series and another Monolith Soft property.

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Feel the Grind and the Burn

Note: I’m the opposite of an exercising expert. Don’t be a dumbass like me and say “This is fine and OK until I get hurt.” Probably actually ask someone who knows what they’re talking about.

(Image Source: PopGeek)

Exercising is hard. It takes a lot of time and dedication. Without the right mindset, it can be almost impossible to keep up with. The same can be said of some older RPGs. While they have their time and place in video game history, a straight forward turn-based combat system can feel like a slog. There’s often limited story telling and more of a focus on wandering aimlessly in a world while grinding.

I am far from the first person, but in recent years I made a commitment to tackle these kind of games and exercising at the same time.

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Cutting the Game out of Video Games


(Image Source: RPGFan)

Although not exclusive to the medium, one of my favorite things about video games is how many elements are includes within a single work. Everything from level design, artistic style, story telling, cinematic direction, music and numerous other bits contributes to the title as a whole. Each aspect can pull from different inspirations as well as individually succeed or fail, while still coming together as one product.

The game-focused aspects of video games are likely most important to the majority of people. However, sometimes developers simply use them as a vehicle for the overall experience rather than the main draw.

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Taking 70 Hours to Find the Fun in Xenoblade Chronicles X

Xenoblade Chronicles X title screen

I’ve had a rough experience with Xenoblade Chronicles X and, after clocking in 100 hours, my time with it ended prematurely. I overwrote my save with a new file. Whoops. Even before my stupidity ruined my playthrough, I had a lot of trouble coming to terms with my feelings about the game. It wasn’t until the last 30 hours that I really started to enjoy what the title had to offer.

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Love Ruins Everyday Life in Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment


Role-playing games usually lead the main characters as far away from the starting town as possible. They explore distant regions and visit new villages while rarely looking back. That being said, it isn’t too uncommon for a game to have a home base or main area players come back to. Sword Art Online: Hollow Fragment isn’t too far from the latter structure with a central city the characters return to after each expedition. However, I’ve never seen a game bring forward the day-to-day aspects of living as much as Hollow Fragment.

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