The Cutting Room Floor Page for Final Fantasy XI

(Special thanks to Remidog for the title screen image!)

The Cutting Room Floor page for Final Fantasy XI is live! If you’re unaware, TCRF is a website used to document unused content from video games. An FFXI page didn’t exist, so I decided to create one for the PC version of Final Fantasy XI. I’m debating making a more extensive blog post to sum up my findings.

Special thanks to Rich Whitehouse who created the Noesis 3D model viewer tool and added support for Final Fantasy XI. I likely wouldn’t have taken up this project without his work allowing me to view and export data from the game.

Also special thanks to OtherEhm, who helped with using HxD and provided general support for setting up the TCRF page as well as deciphering data from Final Fantasy XI.

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One Controller Port Podcast – Episode 29: XenoEverything

This week talk about my time with Valkyria Revolution, the forever changing art style of the Xeno series and another Monolith Soft property.

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Crimson Tears: Big Arsenal, Tiny Rooms

(Image Source: MobyGames)

Seeing a random title with a big publisher’s name on it is always sort of a surprise. I found Crimson Tears for the PlayStation 2 in a game store’s bargin bin, complete with Capcom’s logo on it. Released in 2004, this title completely passed under my radar… Probably because I was deep in a  Final Fantasy XI obsession. Little did I know it actually shares some blood with The Bouncer. DreamFactory is a common developer between the two.  Unsurprisingly, given their previous PS2 release’s middling reception, Crimson Tears is not quite a hidden gem.

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Final Fantasy XI: How the East Transformed Vana’diel

Like any live game, Final Fantasy XI has changed significantly over its fifteen year life. In my five years –  plus some – with the game, I can’t think of a single bigger turning point than the release of the expansion Treasures of Aht Urhgan. The shift in design re-invigorated the game, as well as lightened the oppressive reputation the MMO had built.

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One Controller Port Podcast – Episode 16: Sickness of Destiny

This week I talk about Monolith Software’s new project, the Metal Max/Metal Saga series and upon a fortune cookie that contains a personal favorite of mine.

Relevant links after the break.

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Battling the Inevitability of Nostalgia

Castlelania cut

I’ve feared nostalgia for years. Recommending or highlighting something simply because I enjoyed it as a kid feels irresponsible. I usually want to talk about a game’s current day relevance. Yet as I frowned upon analyzing with rose-tinted glasses, I had a lingering sense of doubt. It seems like a silly question ask, but I started to wonder if I was being influenced by nostalgia when choosing what to play.

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Disappointment: Wristinsaga III

An article written based on a Destructoid community blog topic, focusing on disappointing releases. You can find my original incredibly old and poorly written Xenosaga Episode III review here.

Not having touched Mass Effect series, I can’t really say anything about what’s going on with BioWare and their ending fiasco at the moment. Somethin’ ’bout cupcakes. Cupcakes or not, I can sort of, kind of, almost, not really relate to them with another sci-fi RPG trilogy that was a bit of a disappointment for myself. Monolith Soft’s Xenosaga was set to be one of my favorite series, and a shining example of the developer’s more unique JRPG designs. I have an undying love for the team, thanks to their engaging and strategic battle systems. Xenosaga I and II were true to this. Critics, however, complained about II being overly complicated. Instead of just taking a step back with Xenosaga III, Monolith Soft basically took it to the chopping block and removed everything but the battle system’s torso, reducing it down to a traditional RPG experience. That alone was a disappointment on my part. It was a liveable change, but good heavens the worst was yet to come.

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