One Controller Port Podcast – Episode 34: Demons and Devils

This week I talk about my Valkyria Revolution Article and Toukiden 2.

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Valkyria Revolution: Making the Best of a Bad Situation

Valkyria Revolution is not well-liked. I’ve seen few who think this attempt to re-invent the brand as an Action RPG amounted to anything. By the nature of its design, it’s a repetitive game that almost completely destroys any preconceived notions of Valkyria as a strategy franchise. It seems like it has no business holding the name. But deeper within Valkyria Revolution, one particular aspect of the series remains – managing morale. This overtakes the entirety of the story as well as the gameplay, building the whole experience on the back of this singular element. Though from the beginning, it’s not clear that this is the case.

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One Controller Port Podcast – Episode 28: Game Development Fan Fiction

This week I talk about the recently announced Valkyria Chronicles 4 and The Seven Deadly Sins Knights of Britannia . I also attempt to talk about The Closers and fail.

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ESWAT: City Under Siege — Duke Oda Powered Up

E-SWAT - City Under Siege Box

(Image Source: The Old Computer)

I have a soft spot for everyday characters who play roles in extraordinary stories. Despite not being a super powered hero, chosen one or whatever excuse there is to overcome excruciating odds, they still contribute. Yet, not every person off the street who happens to do something important fills this role. To appreciate a character’s place, a broad enough perspective of the game’s world is required. There also needs to be a level of modesty in their actions and the influence they have.

ESWAT: City Under Siege for the Sega Genesis is quickly disqualified by featuring a character with a super-powered suit, but the game does give the player taste of his life before he gears up as an American Mega Man box art model.

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Feeling the Cold Winter of Shenmue

Shenmue Snow Top Cut

Many like to boil Shenmue down to an open-world adventure game. Fundamentally they wouldn’t be wrong, but it undermines the title’s ambition. What makes the game special is not the countless items you can examine, the number of characters or size of the towns. It’s the craftsmanship of the world, its citizens and how the two interact.

Part of what completes Shenmue is its weather system, which can change the atmosphere of the environment. It’s something I would largely overlook if I didn’t have a surreal experience with it.

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